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Farmworks

Spray Indicator

Available exclusively from Tractor Supply Co.

Don't miss a spot.

Spray Indicator shows applicators where they have sprayed and will help avoid costly oversprays and skips. The colorant dissipates quickly in wet and dry weather and mixes completely with water soluble pesticides and fertilizers without affecting chemical efficacy.

Where to use:

With any pesticide mixture to see where you've sprayed.

When to use:

Use with any chemical mixture to avoid oversprays and skips.

How to use:

Spray Indicator application rates will vary depending on turf color, turf height, and spray application rates.

For optimal rate application, experiment with the volume of spray solution and rate of Spray Indicator to find a rate that is functional and economical.

SUGGESTED RATES:
16-24 ounces per 100 gallons (190 mL per 100 liters) of spray solution treated. For smaller spray applications using backpacks and small sprayers, use 2-3 ounces per 3 gallons (50-75 mL per 10 liters).

SPRAY TANK VOLUME  AMOUNT OF SPRAY INDICATOR
1 gallon 1 teaspoon
3 gallons  2 – 3 ounces
30 gallons  4 – 6 ounces
50 gallons  8 – 12 ounces
100 gallons  16 – 24 ounces

Precautions:

Based on currently available data, this product is not classified as a hazardous substance. However, observe good industrial hygiene practices. Wash hands afetr handling.

Active Ingredients:

Blue dye and coupling agents

Product Label:

Disclaimer:

It is a violation of Federal law to use this product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling. Read the entire label before each use. Use only according to label instructions.

See the complete label for specific use rates and detailed instructions.

Consult the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) for important safety information.

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